LessThunk.com

DAILY COMMENTARY

 

System learns to distinguish words’ phonetic components, without human annotation of training data

Every language has its own collection of phonemes, or the basic phonetic units from which spoken words are composed. Depending on how you count, English has somewhere between 35 and 45. Knowing a language’s phonemes can make it much easier for automated systems to learn to interpret speech.

In the 2015 volume of Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, MIT researchers describe a new machine-learning system that, like several systems before it, can learn to distinguish . But unlike its predecessors, it can also learn to distinguish lower-level phonetic units, such as syllables and phonemes.

As such, it could aid in the development of speech-processing systems for languages that are not widely spoken and don’t have the benefit of decades of linguistic research on their phonetic systems. It could also help make speech-processing systems more portable, since information about lower-level phonetic units could help iron out distinctions between different speakers’ pronunciations.

Read more


Categorised as: interesting

Posted by: Hoween

Comments are disabled on this post


Comments are closed.



Disclaimers – All content here is NOT presented as investment advice; LessThunk is NOT endorsing any website or specific investment by displaying external links.

We may or may-not (coincidentally) hold some quantity of stock or other investment related to any given post, no endorsement is implied in any sense.

css.php